A 1780s Gainsborough hat

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I don’t own a hatstand, so what you see is actually my… kitchen towel holder. It could be worse.

I actually needed a new 1780s hat for my new 1780s riding habit (as much as you need any 1780s hat anyway) and from observing the fashionable imagery of the 1780s, it became quite clear that I needed a hat with a high crown and wide brim rather than decorating my fifth bergere hat.

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A look back to 2017

2017 was the year of very few, very time-consuming projects:

The quilted ensemble

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A new Francaise after one of Boucher’s portraits of Madame de Pompadour

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An embroidered waistcoat

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To be fair, I only finished the embroidery in 2017. The waistcoat itself took a bit longer.

 

Also I made a few pieces that didn’t take that much time:

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The Trinquesse Polonaise

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Nevermind the electric guitar.

Last year around this time I fell in love with a dress from a painting by Louis Rolland Trinquesse.

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Louis Rolland Trinquesse – The Music Party/Gallant Company (1774), Alte Pinakothek Munich

Since I’ve never done a proper Robe à la Polonaise, I decided to  try and make this one.

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Finishing the robe de cour

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I finished the court gown. And yes, I ended up adding a small train.I was out of my original fabric (which I knew from the very beginning) so I just used a gold-colored silk taffeta. I kept it short so it could be actually worn in public without causing accidents, leaving it to drag on the ground a little (it was lined) but not by much. So in the end, it did end up being a grand habit de cour.

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How I finished my robe à la française

The gown that inspired me, is described by its museum asthe apogee of the form [of the robe à la française].

That description alone made this gown such an ambitious project. It intimidated me and it still does. But it also challenged me. I am doing a court gown out of lampas silk for the same reason – if I spend so much time on a project… why not go all out?

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Unfortunately was the best front view photo the one with the dumbest facial expression.

 

So how was it made….

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A Jacket, a Riding Habit and an Anglaise

Okay, fun fact: I have done a lot of stuff recently that I didn’t document making all that well.

These three things are really special though because it’s basically three times of “that pattern wasn’t quite right.”

The Ikea Swallowtail Jacket

I made this with an Ikea Ljusöga pillowcase based on the Swallowtail Jacket at Colonial Williamsburg, using the pattern from Costume Close-Up. It was supposed to be a quick and dirty project. Which became kind of funny when I realized that I had made this one for +6′ tall person and had to alter everything to fit my smaller frame.

One key element was that I wanted the lacing in the front and I wanted that lacing to be functional. But I didn’t wanted the functional lacing to go through the fashion fabric. So I put the lacing holes into an extra linen strip directly under the open sides of the front. That means though that I have to pin the fashion fabric to the strip after lacing, otherwise  the lacing holes would show because the fashion fabric layer just doesn’t lay flat.

The stomacher is lined in red, which means I can turn it around, change the lacing to a white silk and get a whole new look. (I have not done this, despite wearing the jacket at one event twice.)

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Also I had a few lacing holes too many, which in addition to the pinning made this “practical” garment a total pain to lace myself into.

I also made a red petticoat that was supposed to allow some rough handling. It did handle mud okay. But it doesn’t dry very quickly which is not good.

A Riding Habit (ugh)

I basically went for the first worsted wool fabric that looked okay-ish and that was a mistake. I ended up with a really heavy fabric whose feel I didn’t like.

So when I messed up the pattern and ended up missing about 4 inches at my waist, I made the choice (wrong one, obviously) to not undo that and add another fabric piece at the side sesams but rather leaving it open, only held together in the middle of the chest area. (I wanted to be done with that jacket. (Again: mistake.) This meant that I had to make a vest and shirt for sure (instead of cheating), line the jacket’s lapels in light blue silk  and alter it further and further.

So this is my vest and shirt on my dummy double (without the buttons and the buttonholes):

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And these are these things worn by me:

And I love them.

 

Unfortunately, this is the riding habit itself:

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This is actually the best picture!

And I hate it.

It makes my waist look as large as my boobs which is actually ridiculous, it sits awkwardly on my hips, the sleeves look like they will tear themselves out of their armholes when I actually wear it and it weighs 5+ pounds. (Not awesome if you’re travelling.)

I actually stuffed it in the bottom of my closet. (Anyone wants an ugly, heavy riding habit?)

Ironically I was actually assured that this worsted wool fabric will last forever. The worsted news.

 

A hand-printed cotton Anglaise
I also made a Robe à l’Anglaise out of handprinted Indian cotton (which used plant-based dyes) which is so historically correct that I felt I should have worn a sign that said as much along with it.

The funny thing about this dress was finished so quickly that I failed to document much of the process.

 

The thing was that the cotton was very thin, so I lined the entire robe. (Linen in the bodice, thin cotton for the rest.)

I added the elbow sleeve thingies because I made the sleeves a bit too short. Unfortunately I was so out of fabric that it was all pieced. (That’s why the petticoat is a cheat petticoat that only used the fabric where it showed.) To cover up the pieced-ness of the elbow things I added a bit of ruffle which was even more pieced.

Me wearing it (I fixed the small gap since then.)

A Silk Lampas cap

I started looking at a lot of caps and my favorite was the combination of silk lampas and gold lace. I have found none of these in aristocratic portraits of adult women, so this cap is fabulously unsuited to go with, like, 95 percent of my 18th century wardrobe. But the heart wants what it wants, right?

 

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This was a major inspiration. As were a few extent caps.

The pattern was an alteration of a Duran Textiles cap pattern that I further altered on the cap itself after the one corner looked way too harsh.

 

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I traced this off my computer screen because my printer is out of commission.

I flatlined the three pieces individually with a firm cotton (I had ran out of linen):

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Making sure some  of the brocaded flowers made it onto the cap.

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And then I sewed everything together with small backstitches. For some reason this took me 3 hours. (Addmittedly, I watched tv while doing this which never helps.)

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The was the moment I realized that the corner edge didn’t look so swell.

Then I applied the vintage gold lace by sewing both the inner and outer edge of the lace to the cap.

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And that was it:

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And to give you an idea of its dimensions; that’s what it looks like when it’s worn: